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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW FOR TUESDAY, JANUARY 10TH, 2023

 

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1. GA Special Grand Jury Completes Investigation into Charges of Trump Vote Tampering

 

 

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Source: JJ Gouin / Getty

What You Need to Know:

According to a new filing, the Fulton County, Georgia grand jury investigating the actions of Donald Trump and others following the 2020 presidential election, has completed its work. The special grand jury was impaneled to look into whether the former president and allies committed any crimes to overturn his loss in the 2020 election.

 

2. President Biden Visits the Wall

WRITTEN AND CONTRIBUTED BY KHAMERON RILEY

 

President Lopez Obrador Welcomes President Biden

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What You Need to Know:

Last Thursday, President Biden announced the United States will begin blocking migrants from Haiti, Nicaragua, and Cuba from applying for asylum if they’re apprehended crossing the U.S.-Mexico border.

The asylum seekers will instead be expelled to Mexico without due process as part of an expansion of the contested Trump-era Title 42 pandemic policy.

This comes as the Supreme Court is set to decide Title 42’s fate in its next session.

Biden did not mention the harsh U.S. sanctions that have contributed to poverty in Nicaragua and Cuba, nor did he acknowledge the catastrophic legacy of U.S. interventions in Haiti.

 

3. Vermont Raises COVID-19 Death Toll After Entry Errors

 

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What You Need to Know:

The Vermont Health Department on Friday increased the state’s COVID-19 death toll by nearly 11% after a review found that more than 80 deaths hadn’t been properly entered into a state database.

The increase in deaths from 791 to 877 since the start of the pandemic was attributed in part to a reduction in staff as the COVID-19 emergency wound down.

The state’s health commissioner, Dr. Mark Levine, said in a statement that the department was dedicated to consistent surveillance and accurate reporting.

 

4. Student Arrested at HBCU for Not Apologizing to Professor

WRITTEN AND CONTRIBUTED BY COY MALONE

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What You Need to Know:

A dispute between a professor and a student at Winston-Salem State University led to the student being arrested.

Video of the December 14 incident was captured on cellphone video by multiple students, with one gaining over 1.5 million views on TikTok. In the video, two police officers put cuffs on the student while the student recording says the student being arrested only responded to the teacher who had raised her voice first. “I swear to God, I hate you. You’re the worst teacher ever,” the student says. “You get me taken out of here because you don’t want to apologize because I won’t apologize? You started yelling at me. You tried to embarrass me about my paper. You’re a terrible teacher.”

5. Sneaky Ways Inflation Affects Your Money in 2023

 

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What You Need to Know:

By now, you’re probably familiar with the more obvious ways inflation affects your finances. Your money doesn’t go as far at the grocery store, for example. Credit card and other variable-rate debt is getting more expensive as the Federal Reserve raises short-term interest rates to combat inflation. Rates are also rising, albeit more slowly, on savings accounts.

But other ways inflation helps or hurts have gotten less attention. Here are some of the major changes to watch for in 2023.

BIG TAX CHANGES BENEFIT MOST TAXPAYERS

The IRS raised the standard deduction, which is taken by more than 90% of taxpayers, by $1,800 for married couples filing jointly and by $900 for single filers. The standard deduction amounts in 2023 will be $27,700 for married couples and $13,850 for singles.

Sybil Wilkes ‘What You Need To Know’ DA Willis Will Determine The Next Steps — President Biden Visits The Wall — Student At HBCU Arrested  was originally published on blackamericaweb.com